Thursday, May 16, 2024

Thursday, May 16, 2024

Thursday, May 16, 2024

9 min read

9 min read

9 min read

Guide: How To Stop Phone Addiction (for Students)

Guide: How To Stop Phone Addiction (for Students)

Guide: How To Stop Phone Addiction (for Students)

Being a student is often being young and carefree. We do things without fully considering the consequences... until we're up against a wall. Often, that wake-up call comes during exams! Assignments turned in late, forgotten, or even abandoned—when smartphone addiction leads us to make poor decisions.

At Jomo, we welcome a lot of students every day (and you're welcome too). Most come because they realize time is slipping by but their studies haven't progressed. Or worse, their assignment was due... yesterday.

If you thought you were the only one this happens to, rest assured, you're not alone. In fact, according to a recent survey, 67% of teachers notice that their students are negatively impacted by phone use. That's more than half of all learners falling victim to their habits. See, you’re not alone!

Alright, you have a problem. But where to start? To avoid skipping steps and wasting time looking for a miracle solution, let's take a bit more time to discuss the issue and provide you with a practical and theoretical guide on how to regain control over your phone.

This article wasn't written with ChatGPT. We've combed through tons of studies, read books, and educated ourselves to help you. So, no rehashed advice or worse, AI-tainted banalities here. 100% handmade, with heart, and a bit of smarts.

Finding Your Intrinsic Motivation

Perhaps you've never heard of Intrinsic Motivation, so let us explain it simply. In life, we can be driven by two types of motivations: Intrinsic and Extrinsic. Intrinsic motivation is being driven by something that brings pleasure because it satisfies who we are or who we want to be (e.g., "I study the arts because I know I want to be an artist; it's my essence"). On the other hand, extrinsic motivation means doing an activity for a physical "reward": money, praise, competition, etc.

While extrinsic motivation may seem more rewarding initially, it doesn't last in the long run. In the 1970s-80s, researchers Deci & Ryan developed the "Self Determination Theory" (SDT). In his initial study, Deci explained that he asked participants to solve a puzzle for money and others just for praise. The results showed that those who received money gave up on solving the puzzle quicker than those who did not.

SDT makes it clear: don't wait for a material reward to be motivated; find a purpose in yourself to drive you. The same applies to succeeding in your studies: find within you the reason that pushes you to pursue this course: Who do you want to be, become? What do you love about this course? How should it make you proud? These answers will take you far!

Building Healthy Habits

College life is the beginning of "one's own life." We're finally in control, making the decisions. And as a great hero 🕷️ once said: "With great power comes great responsibility."

It's tough to find the right balance between being too permissive with oneself (indulging in every pleasure without limits or moderation) and being too restrictive (denying oneself the opportunity to live and try new things). And you might not always have the right support in this quest!

🍔 From Fast-Food To Healthy Meals

This is probably the first argument that comes to mind when you think about McDonald's and other popular chains. "I eat there because I'm too lazy to cook." And they've understood this well, hence why the slogan of the American chain is "Come as you are."

It's important not to yield to your laziness and let yourself be manipulated by junk food services. Indulging occasionally is one thing, making it your main diet is another.

  • Do I really need this?

  • Don’t I already have food?

  • Is this meal actually good for me?

  • Are these $10 worth it?

  • What am I trying to satisfy by consuming this meal?

  • Can I find this comfort elsewhere, in something healthier?

To help set limits, you can download the Jomo app for free, available on iPhone and Mac. You can easily block food delivery apps by going to Rules > Sessions.

🔞 From Porn To Sexual Well-Being

Recent surveys indicate that about 15% of youth aged 14 to 18 watch pornography daily (sometimes even multiple times a day), and 69% of American men are consumers. The transition from adolescence to young adulthood is a critical time for shaping one's relationship with pornography. This is when the pattern sets in.

Far from just being "entertainment," pornography has no positive impact on your mental health or your body, mainly for two reasons:

  • Poor management of pleasure and frustration: You train your body to succumb to the slightest impulses, losing resistance. This need for quick, immediate, instant gratification becomes a real issue. Many find that once in a stable relationship, they are dissatisfied with their partner not delivering the same level of pleasure as pornography.

  • Massive dopamine secretion and a disruption of the reward system: Recent studies have shown that the brain activity of a pornography consumer can mirror that of someone addicted to alcohol, for instance. These individuals often struggle to manage frustration and may engage in risky sexual behaviors in society or towards themselves. Porn consumption is not a "stable" habit but one prone to escalation: the more you consume, the more you want, yet it’s never enough.

Once again, you can use the Jomo app to help. In the Rules > Session section, we have a "Adult Content" model that blocks all popular porn sites. You can add it for a duration of your choice, whether for a temporary "detox" or a permanent goodbye.

🍑 From Dating Burnout To Real-World Encounters

In 2024, there are hundreds of dating apps, some of which claim to be "designed to be deleted" (implying you'll find your true love). Despite the promise of connection, loneliness has never been higher while Tinder now boasts its highest revenue ever, making it the most profitable app, surpassing even Netflix.

Young adults are prime targets for these platforms: "It's the age to experiment," as seen in countless ads on social media and TV. However, the reality is less "romantic" than advertised. According to the Pew Research Center, 43% of women under 50 who have used Tinder report negative experiences, such as unsolicited sexual messages or persistent contact after declining.

Ultimately, these services are designed to maximize consumption, but do they truly help you meet interesting people? It’s debatable. For women, 54% say they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages received.

So, how do you meet people effectively?

  • Prioritize physical meetings: Public places, universities, study spaces. Here, you'll meet people who share something with you: a love for the place.

  • Join collectives, associations, or groups focused on topics you enjoy.

  • Attend community or student events. (And remember, you don't have to party or go to bars!)

If you feel dependent on these dating apps and find it hard to stop using them, try at least to regulate your usage. Visit them as little as possible and if you find yourself spending too much time on them, disconnect before purchasing extras for more swipes.

🎰 From Gambling To Investing Wisely

Being a student often means being broke—but that's "normal." You're not working, you don’t have a steady income, and you lack experience. Don't try to become a millionaire by 20.

  • Be cautious with online betting sites. While the system may seem appealing and the potential winnings tempting, it remains a "game"—you have a 50/50 chance of winning or losing. And if these platforms generate such high revenue, it's statistically because there are more losers than winners.

  • Be wary of financial investment sites. Whether it's training courses or "tips" from influencers, financial investing is a highly specific process. You don't become a trader by watching YouTube videos.

  • Be cautious with cryptocurrencies & NFTs. Those touting the success of speculation are not telling you everything. This is a business that again, results in more losers than winners. Once more, it involves speculation, investments, and many nuances that you and I, mere mortals, know nothing about!

If you find it difficult to resist, you can use Jomo to schedule blocking sessions during the most tempting periods: sport events, etc. Just go to Rules > Sessions.

Don’t worry, TikTok will always be around

But your

won't wait.

Better Screen Time

Made simple. See by yourself.

⚡️

💜

🔒

⌨️

🌿

🌿

🌙

Don’t worry, TikTok will always be around

But your

won't wait.

Better Screen Time

All made simple. See by yourself.

⚡️

💜

🔒

⌨️

🌿

🌿

🌙

Don’t worry, TikTok will always be around

But your

won't wait.

Better Screen Time

Made simple. See by yourself.

⚡️

💜

🔒

⌨️

🌿

🌿

🌙

Don’t worry, TikTok will always be around

But your

won't wait.

Better Screen Time

All made simple. See by yourself.

Don’t worry, TikTok will always be around

But your

won't wait.

Better Screen Time

Made simple. See by yourself.

⚡️

💜

🔒

⌨️

🌿

🌿

🌙

Creating a Conducive Work Environment

It might seem elementary, yet it's vastly underestimated: your workspace. When you're a student, your living space is often limited and serves multiple functions. Even if it’s not obvious, there are a few tricks to optimize your workspace.

🗑️ Air Out the Space

Avoid accumulating too many belongings, especially those unrelated to work. Try to have a clean desk or worktable, free of objects and clutter. This is crucial as it helps avoid procrastination and distraction.

🛏️ Avoid the Bed

The worst thing you can do: work in your bed. A bed is a place of rest, not productivity or dining. If it’s a sofa bed, force yourself to convert it back to a sofa during the day. Otherwise, invest in a proper chair and table. It's vital not to mix work and rest; it’s one of the main reasons we procrastinate—we're not in 'work mode.'

🏠 Not at Home?

If your home environment doesn’t work for you, don’t stay there. Head to the university library, shared offices, coworking spaces, or any shared work area.

"Collective work... helps combat the passivity and dispersion of students, reduces hours of conventional classes, rationalizes content, and adapts to digital habits" — Denis Lemaitre, University of Brest

Seeing other students work efficiently can also provide additional motivation. The space is often very quiet, full of resources, and ideal for making new connections.

🔒️ Block Distractions

It might seem obvious, but when you’re studying, don’t keep your phone with you. Create a work ritual free from distractions:

  • Block social media and other distracting apps with a "Focus" session

  • Keep your phone away (put it in another room or in a box, but out of sight)

  • Block other distractions on your Mac with Jomo or on your PC with a free extension.

Accepting Effort BEFORE Reward

The sooner we learn this, the better: nothing in life comes by chance or accident; it takes work to achieve it, and we must embrace the effort—especially in a professional setting. Indeed, a paycheck doesn’t just magically appear at the end of the month without effort; it's earned through work. It's best to accept this reality early on and apply it swiftly to avoid a rude awakening in your first professional experience.

Your life shouldn't be ruled by entertainment or solely positive experiences; balance is key. You can use streaming apps, but they shouldn't occupy half of your day. Even if you have free time, remember that these services are addictive—the more you use them, the more you'll feel the need for them, making it harder to cut back. Here are a few tips to manage this:

🎁 Work Equals Reward

Turn your greatest temptations into rewards. Tell yourself that an hour of intense work equals one 45-minute episode of your favorite series. You can use the Jomo app to help manage this, go to Rules > Conditions > + > Good Apps First. Specify a work app on your phone, set a reasonable daily budget, and choose an app to unlock after meeting your goal.

🍅 Working In Intervals

If staying focused isn't your strong suit, consider a more flexible approach to work, like the Pomodoro Technique. I invite you to read our article on this subject, where we explain how it works and how you can implement it at home.

🚩 Accepting Progress

The brain is a massive muscle: if you haven't trained it for years, don't expect Olympic-level performance. Progress must be gradual. Start simple, then slowly increase the intensity and difficulty. You'll achieve far more this way than if you try to force it when your brain isn’t ready.

Well, there you have it—a complete guide! We've done our best to give you as much advice as possible to help you ace your studies. If you need a boost, don’t hesitate to try Jomo for free. If there’s one thing to remember: create an environment that suits you and at the same time allows you to succeed in your exams.

🔗 Slick Text ; Innovation Pédagogique ; Study 1 ; Study 2 ; Wikipedia ; Pew Research Center | ✋ Illustrations by Jomo ; Photography by Unsplash.

Made with love in Brittany